Category Archives: Health Care Industry

Multi-patient losses create real financial challenges for medical professional insurers

Recent headlines have confirmed that health care providers are increasingly being held liable for multiple patient injuries and deaths, an issue previously highlighted in research by Willis Re. Since our initial blog following the conviction of breast surgeon Ian Paterson, reports … Continue reading →

Following up: U.S. health care debate

With the July 28 defeat of health care reform legislation on the Senate floor, the ACA remains in effect. However, the political uncertainty surrounding the law continues. So, as policymakers determine their next steps, here are a few points for … Continue reading →

Employer priorities shaping demand for value-based care delivered by health systems

Health systems are facing a number of factors that are significantly changing the industry, including emerging consumerism, expanding use of technology, regulatory complexity and disruptive competition. Out of all of this, the issues with a fee-for-service model within health care … Continue reading →

Health systems urged to be disruptors – Not disrupted

A record 3,000 U.S. (and beyond) hospital business and strategy leaders, attending the 2017 Becker’s Hospital Review Annual Meeting in Chicago recently, heard recurring themes about how to create opportunities for health systems to thrive. The dual challenge: improve patient … Continue reading →

Doctor’s conviction throws multiple patient injuries back into spotlight

In late April, UK breast surgeon Dr. Ian Paterson was found guilty of 17 counts of “wounding with intent,” throwing a spotlight on the topic of multiple patient injuries and how they affect insurers and health care providers. One bad … Continue reading →

Uptake of robotic-assisted surgery brings risk

Once considered a far-fetched science fiction notion, robotics is now being used in the medical arena, offering transformative potential in patient care, prostheses and surgery. The proliferation of surgical robotics offers many cost- and precision-related advantages, but it also gives … Continue reading →

How behavioral economics can improve well-being

We are learning that we can use the way our brains are hardwired to help improve our health. Continue reading →

What risks will emerge in 2017?

A look at the emerging risks for 2017 reveals two clear touchpoints: people and politics – and especially politics. Risk experts in areas ranging from human capital to transportation, from Washington, DC to Brazil are looking at the broad implications … Continue reading →

What makes communicating to employees in the healthcare industry so difficult?

Brilliant scientists. Empathetic care givers. Hundreds of support staff who keep the lights on. All of this in an environment that never has a day off. That only touches on the difficulties of connecting with employees in the healthcare industry. Continue reading →

Preparing for the Trump administration

One of the main takeaways from the election is that we live in a time of disruption, and with Obamacare a lightning-rod issue in the campaign, the U.S. health care and benefits system appears to be headed for plenty of … Continue reading →