Tag Archives: hurricanes

Preparing for seasonality, hurricane season and beyond

hurricane-damage

More understanding of and attention to seasonality in all of its various forms can not only help grow and improve the ILS market but also make the broader (re)insurance markets more effective and efficient. Continue reading →

Dispelling the myth: Hurricane Andrew didn’t happen in an El Niño year

hurricane-andrew_645x400

In the 20 or so years that span my reinsurance career the subject of the influence of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on Atlantic hurricanes has often come up. And the topic invariable leads to the following comment “Yes, but didn’t … Continue reading →

A “drought” of major hurricane landfalls? Science weighs in.

NOAA-hurricane-frances

Hurricane season is here. Tropical Storm Colin is the third named storm in the Atlantic basin this year, and has brought rough seas, heavy rain and flooding to Florida and parts of the east coast of the U.S. So far … Continue reading →

What could a La Niña mean for insured property exposure along the U.S. coast?

La Nina Property Exposure

June 1 marked the beginning of hurricane season in the Atlantic Basin for 2016. Willis Towers Watson Wire recently published a blog on our predictions for this season based on Colorado State University’s forecast. With the hurricane season in mind, … Continue reading →

2016 Atlantic Basin seasonal hurricane forecast: Average, but what does that mean?

2016HurricanePredictions

The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season will likely have activity near the average 1981-2010 season, with 90% probability of U.S. major hurricane landfall. Continue reading →

2015 El Niño – Impacts on Hurricane Activity and Climate Links to Reinsurance Loss Activity

sea-surface-temperature-anomolies-sept2015

2015 El Niño As predicted earlier this year, an El Niño event has been developing in the Equatorial Pacific. By most objective metrics, the event looks to be strong, with all defining atmospheric or oceanic variables showing the characteristic El … Continue reading →

Strongest El Niño in Decades

El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO)

Seasonal forecasting is a developing science. Skill is required for the scientific production of the forecast, but also in interpreting the information. However, if there is ever going to be a good time to check these long range forecasts, it … Continue reading →

Climate Resilience and Graceful Failure

climate_resilence

Extreme weather events are opportunists. They strike indiscriminately, and selectively expose the parts of society that are underprepared and most vulnerable. We see the lack of resilience to extreme events in the most susceptible regions time and time again in … Continue reading →

Interactive Map of Hurricane Katrina

interactive hurricane katrina

Only ten years ago the city of New Orleans, “the Big Easy” was left battered and broken by ravaging winds and unyielding storm surge brought in by Hurricane Katrina. Even though it was a highly anticipated and well-forecast storm, Katrina … Continue reading →

10 Years On: The Evolution of Modeling Since Katrina

Risk modelling experts on the evolution of hurricane catastrophe models since Hurricane Katrina

The re/insurance industry used catastrophe risk models long before Hurricane Katrina, but Katrina challenged the standards of these models. It called into question the quality of exposure data, how the models were used and their suitability for various business applications. … Continue reading →