Blogger Archives: Geoffrey Saville

Geoffrey Saville

Geoffrey Saville is a member of Willis Towers Watson's Analytics Technology Team, having joined the company in 2013 as the Willis Research Network’s Atmospheric Hub Leader. In this role, he coordinates the research into atmospheric and climate science to derive tangible outputs for Willis clients and the wider insurance industry. Geoff’s background is in meteorology, having worked with the UK Met Office and the Bermuda Weather Service

A hurricane season of record-breaking storms – Part 2: What will the future hold?

This is a continuation of a previous blog post, A hurricane season of record-breaking storms – Part 1: Historical context With every large storm, there are always questions concerning climate change. Can storms such as those we’ve seen in recent … Continue reading →

A hurricane season of record-breaking storms – Part 1: Historical context

Hurricane season 2017 will leave many scars. A succession of September Hurricanes have left trails of devastation across many Caribbean Islands, as well as caused widespread flooding and loss across many southern states of the U.S. In fact, it was … Continue reading →

Deadly Hurricane Irma continues towards Florida

Sitting in a conference hall at Columbia University seems far away from violence and destruction being caused by Major Hurricane Irma. However, this conference (The Workshop on Atlantic Climate Variability – Dynamics, Prediction and Hurricane Risk) hosts some of the … Continue reading →

Peak hurricane season is approaching. What can we expect?

Two months of 2017 Atlantic Hurricane season down, four more to go. With the peak of this year’s hurricane season yet to pass, so far we have seen seven named storms. None of these storms have become hurricanes, but echoes … Continue reading →

Hurricane season forecast: What to expect for 2017?

Atlantic hurricane season is officially here; it started yesterday and will continue through November 30. This is the time when most tropical cyclones in the Atlantic form, but not all. Take for instance, Tropical Storm Arlene, which was short-lived, weak … Continue reading →

Managing severe thunderstorm risk: Looking beyond the weather forecast

As we reach the middle of Spring, the U.S. hail and tornado season is in full swing. March is a changeable month, in weather-terms. There’s an old saying that goes something like this: “March comes in like a lion, goes … Continue reading →

Tropical Cyclone Debbie slams Australian coastline

Cyclone Debbie

Slow-moving Cyclone Debbie brought strong winds and torrential rains accumulating more than 200mm over 24 hours in many places, causing widespread coastal flooding. Continue reading →

Latest on El Niño predictions for 2016: A looming La Niña?

El Niño and La Niña have well-established links to hurricane activity. The impact on the re/insurance sector depends on when the potential La Niña sets in. Continue reading →

How to model a windstorm

Storm Angus hit the U.K. earlier this month (also known as Nannette as designated by the Free University of Berlin). Although insurance industry losses are not expected have much impact on the reinsurance industry, the storm did produce high winds … Continue reading →

Space weather spawns earthbound risks

The University of Cambridge's scenario-based study examines the impacts and derived economic impacts from an extreme space weather event such as a solar storm. Continue reading →

Posts by Author in Portuguese:

Como o seguro pode ajudar na adaptação às mudanças climáticas?

Um cenário de animação, otimismo cauteloso, ceticismo e cinismo foi difundido no mundo da ciência climática e gestão de risco, após a 21ª Conferência das Nações Unidas sobre Mudança do Clima, conhecida como COP21, que aconteceu recentemente em Paris. Continuar lendo →

Posts by Author in Spanish:

Huracán Matthew

El huracán más mortal en 11 años llegó hace unos veinte días. Después de hacerse camino a través del Caribe, por Haití y al oriente de Cuba, a través de las Bahamas y luego a lo largo de la costa este … Sigue Leyendo →

El Niño Más Fuerte Desde Hace Décadas

El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO)

La predicción del tiempo es una ciencia en desarrollo que requiere cierta destreza no solo para la producción científica del pronóstico, sino también para la interpretación de la información. Sin embargo, si alguna vez habrá un buen momento para revisar … Sigue Leyendo →