Category Archives: Risk Culture

How risk appetite frameworks can be more than ‘tick-box’ exercises

Woman in a suite writing on a white board while a man in a suit and tie is reading the board

When we talk to board members of insurance companies, we often hear that risk appetite frameworks are too far removed from the day-to-day reality of conducting business and their only purpose is to satisfy regulatory or rating-agency requirements. But if … Continue reading →

Are you ready for peak 2018 hurricane season?

a car submerged under water

While current predictions indicate a relatively quiet hurricane season, particularly in comparison to last year, it only takes one major hurricane making landfall in a built-up area to create a significant loss, as we saw with Hurricane Andrew in 1992 … Continue reading →

Are new laws that will make directors of holding companies accountable for the sale of distressed subsidiaries a charter for zombies?

black crow and a pigeon standing on a slab of concrete surrounded by water

I’ve written before about the extent to which English courts have been prepared to lift the corporate veil and hold a parent company responsible for the acts and defaults of another company in the same group. In the Chandler case, … Continue reading →

Midyear update: Most dangerous risks for insurers in 2018

Close up of caution tape over a rail

In January, we wrote about 2018’s most dangerous risks for insurers, highlighting what more than 200 insurance managers cited as the top 10 risks to watch for the year. Now that we’re midway through 2018, it’s time to take a … Continue reading →

Want to create a cyber-resilient organization? Start with your board of directors

Man holding a laptop while looking at servers with a female colleague. Both have security badges around their neck

No company — regardless of size or stature — is immune from cyberattack. Given their pervasiveness, it’s no longer enough to have a thorough, carefully constructed plan to mitigate against cyber risk. The thinking “It won’t happen to me because … Continue reading →

Three tips for senior managers seeking to avoid reputational damage

man in a suit leaning over a railing

A theme to which I often return is the extent to which there is scope for divergence of interest between individuals and their employers, especially in the context of regulatory investigations. For more, see my blog, Supreme Court victory for … Continue reading →

Learning about natural hazards: A recap of Willis Research Network’s spring seminar series

streets flooded around a building

This past spring, Willis Research Network (WRN) hosted a series of morning seminars that featured a number of research projects and partners. Topics ranged from severe convective storms to corporate risk profiling, and included findings from some of the WRN’s … Continue reading →

Don’t let your actuaries sit on the bench on IFRS17

Accountant adding figures on a calculator

IFRS17 may be an accounting standard, but getting ready for it requires serious actuarial input. The January 1, 2021 live date for the new international insurance accounting standard, IFRS17, is somewhat deceptive. The reality is that, due to the need … Continue reading →

Avoid these 4 pitfalls to favorably resolve challenging environmental claims

Environmental worker in a hazmat suit putting a soil sample into a bottle

From obtaining a carrier’s consent before incurring costs, to a straightforward late claims notice, making an environmental insurance claim can be fraught with hazards. All can be avoided with early, accurate information. The most important test of environmental insurance comes … Continue reading →

Insights from the Willis Re Flood Club: the weaknesses and strengths of flood modelling

cars in flooded parking lot

When industry experts gathered to consider the state of flood modelling, they discovered a disconnect between theory and reality that can leave insurers under some expensive water. So what’s next for modelling approaches? Insurers are worried about their flood exposure. … Continue reading →