Tag Archives: hurricanes

A “drought” of major hurricane landfalls? Science weighs in.

Hurricane season is here. Tropical Storm Colin is the third named storm in the Atlantic basin this year, and has brought rough seas, heavy rain and flooding to Florida and parts of the east coast of the U.S. So far … Continue reading →

What could a La Niña mean for insured property exposure along the U.S. coast?

June 1 marked the beginning of hurricane season in the Atlantic Basin for 2016. Willis Towers Watson Wire recently published a blog on our predictions for this season based on Colorado State University’s forecast. With the hurricane season in mind, … Continue reading →

2016 Atlantic Basin seasonal hurricane forecast: Average, but what does that mean?

The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season will likely have activity near the average 1981-2010 season, with 90% probability of U.S. major hurricane landfall. Continue reading →

2015 El Niño – Impacts on Hurricane Activity and Climate Links to Reinsurance Loss Activity

2015 El Niño As predicted earlier this year, an El Niño event has been developing in the Equatorial Pacific. By most objective metrics, the event looks to be strong, with all defining atmospheric or oceanic variables showing the characteristic El … Continue reading →

Strongest El Niño in Decades

El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO)

Seasonal forecasting is a developing science. Skill is required for the scientific production of the forecast, but also in interpreting the information. However, if there is ever going to be a good time to check these long range forecasts, it … Continue reading →

Climate Resilience and Graceful Failure

Extreme weather events are opportunists. They strike indiscriminately, and selectively expose the parts of society that are underprepared and most vulnerable. We see the lack of resilience to extreme events in the most susceptible regions time and time again in … Continue reading →

Interactive Map of Hurricane Katrina

interactive hurricane katrina

Only ten years ago the city of New Orleans, “the Big Easy” was left battered and broken by ravaging winds and unyielding storm surge brought in by Hurricane Katrina. Even though it was a highly anticipated and well-forecast storm, Katrina … Continue reading →

10 Years On: The Evolution of Modeling Since Katrina

Risk modelling experts on the evolution of hurricane catastrophe models since Hurricane Katrina

The re/insurance industry used catastrophe risk models long before Hurricane Katrina, but Katrina challenged the standards of these models. It called into question the quality of exposure data, how the models were used and their suitability for various business applications. … Continue reading →

Haiyan Loss

Super Typhoon Haiyan's Eye - detailed infrared image from NASA/NOAA

Every time there is a major natural catastrophe somewhere in the world, losses are measured in several terms. First and foremost there is the human cost. While the loss of life may eventually be measured in a number, the suffering … Continue reading →

Lessons from Hurricane Sandy: “A Wake-up Call”

Hurricane Sandy: NJ coast. A handout photograph by the US Air Force on 30 October 2012, taken during a search and rescue mission by 1-150 Assault Helicopter Battalion, New Jersey Army National Guard, in New Jersey, USA. Credit: EPA

Maybe the reason this year’s hurricane season has been so light is that last year’s gave us so much to think about. Insurers realized they were underpricing a serious exposure – “we were giving it away,” one underwriter said. Continue reading →